April 1, 2016

Erin Palinski, RD, CDE, LDN Feedback from TappMD Expert
Erin Palinski, RD, CDE, LDN
Magnesium
Because their bones are developing, it is essential for children to be getting adequate calcium in their diet to decrease their risk of osteoporosis in the future. New studies are showing that magnesium may play an important role in bone health and should be increased in children’s diets. Foods like salmon and almonds are great sources of magnesium!

May 5, 2013 — Parents are advised to make sure their children drink milk and eat other calcium-rich foods to build strong bones. Soon, they also may be urged to make sure their kids eat salmon, almonds and other foods high in magnesium — another nutrient that may play an important role in bone health, according to a study to be presented Sunday, May 5, at the Pediatric Academic Societies (PAS) annual meeting in Washington, DC.

“Lots of nutrients are key for children to have healthy bones. One of these appears to be magnesium,” said lead author Steven A. Abrams MD, FAAP, professor of pediatrics at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston. “Calcium is important, but, except for those children and adolescents with very low intakes, may not be more important than magnesium.”

While it is known that magnesium is important for bone health in adults, few studies have looked at whether magnesium intake and absorption are related to bone mineral content in young children. This study aimed to fill that gap.

Researchers recruited 63 healthy children ages 4 to 8 years old who were not taking any multivitamins or minerals to participate in the study. Children were hospitalized overnight twice so their calcium and magnesium levels could be measured.

Participants filled out food diaries prior to hospitalization. All foods and beverages served during their hospital stay contained the same amount of calcium and magnesium they consumed in a typical day based on the diaries. Foods and beverages were weighed before and after each meal to determine how much calcium and magnesium the subjects actually consumed. In addition, parents were given scales to weigh their child’s food for three days at home after the first inpatient stay and for three days at home prior to the second inpatient stay so that dietary intake of calcium and magnesium could be calculated accurately.

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The above story is reprinted from materials provided by American Academy of Pediatrics, via EurekAlert!, a service of AAAS.

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Erin Palinski, RD, CDE, LDN

Erin Palinski, RD, CDE, LDN, CPT promotes nutrition and wellness as an author, media spokesperson, motivational speaker, and corporate consultant. Erin is the author of the newly released “Belly Fat Diet for Dummies” (Wiley 2012) as well as the creator and author of the Healthy 'n Fit Weight Management Program and the Healthy Resolutions Weight Management Program. She also serves as the featured expert in the #1 best selling diabetes Ipad App “Diabetes: What Now” by Everydayhealth and is the featured nutrition expert on the weekly syndicated health show KnowMoreTV.