March 1, 2016

Saralyn Mark, MD Feedback from TappMD Expert
Saralyn Mark, MD
How much is too much?
Vitamin D deficiency is very common so there has been a big effort to increase awareness of the importance in having levels checked and to consciously increase the amount of Vitamin D in our diets as necessary, including supplements. This new research shows there is a fine line between adequate and too much intake which may cause harm.

In recent years, healthy people have been bombarded by stories in the media and on health websites warning about the dangers of too-low vitamin D levels, and urging high doses of supplements to protect against everything from hypertension to hardening of the arteries to diabetes.

But new research from Johns Hopkins finds that blood levels of the so-called “sunshine vitamin” higher than the top of the range suggested by the Institute of Medicine confer no additional benefit. This finding, combined with results of a previous study by the same group noting potential harm from higher vitamin D levels in healthy people, has urged investigators to prescribe caution.

“Healthy people have been popping these pills, but they should not continue taking vitamin D supplements unchecked,” says study leader Muhammad Amer, M.D., M.H.S., an assistant professor in the Division of General Internal Medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. “At a certain point, more vitamin D no longer confers any survival benefit, so taking these expensive supplements is at best a…

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Saralyn Mark, MD

Saralyn Mark, MD, an endocrinologist, geriatrician and women's health specialist, was the first Senior Medical Advisor to the Office on Women's Health within the Department of Health and Human Services for 11 years and to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). As Senior Medical Advisor, Dr. Mark was responsible for the development and analysis of initiatives and programs on emerging technologies, public health preparedness, physician workforce issues, sex and gender-based medicine and women's health on Earth and in Space.