March 1, 2016

Erin Palinski, RD, CDE, LDN Feedback from TappMD Expert
Erin Palinski, RD, CDE, LDN
Exercise Regularly
Can’t find a good enough reason to exercise regularly? A new study suggests that regular exercise noticeably improves memory. Combining weight training and aerobic exercise can improve your spatial and verbal memory. Only when done consistently and regularly, improvements in memory are seen. What are you waiting for? Incorporate an exercise regimen into your daily schedule.

Two new experiments, one involving people and the other animals, suggest that regular exercise can substantially improve memory, although different types of exercise seem to affect the brain quite differently. The news may offer consolation for the growing numbers of us who are entering age groups most at risk for cognitive decline.

It was back in the 1990s that scientists at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies in La Jolla, Calif., first discovered that exercise bulks up the brain. In groundbreaking experiments, they showed that mice given access to running wheels produced far more cells in an area of the brain controlling memory creation than animals that didn’t run. The exercised animals then performed better on memory tests than their sedentary labmates.

Since then, scientists have been working to understand precisely how, at a molecular level, exercise improves memory, as well as whether all types of exercise, including weight training, are beneficial.

The new studies provide some additional and inspiring clarity on those issues, as well as, incidentally, on how you can get lab rats to weight train.

For the human study, published in The Journal of Aging Research, scientists at the University of British Columbia recruited dozens of women ages 70 to 80 who had been found to have mild cognitive impairment, a condition that makes a person’s memory and thinking more muddled than would be expected at a given age.

Mild cognitive impairment is also a recognized risk factor for increasing dementia. Seniors with the condition develop Alzheimer’s disease at much higher rates than those of the same age with sharper memories.

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Erin Palinski, RD, CDE, LDN

Erin Palinski, RD, CDE, LDN, CPT promotes nutrition and wellness as an author, media spokesperson, motivational speaker, and corporate consultant. Erin is the author of the newly released “Belly Fat Diet for Dummies” (Wiley 2012) as well as the creator and author of the Healthy 'n Fit Weight Management Program and the Healthy Resolutions Weight Management Program. She also serves as the featured expert in the #1 best selling diabetes Ipad App “Diabetes: What Now” by Everydayhealth and is the featured nutrition expert on the weekly syndicated health show KnowMoreTV.