March 6, 2016

Janet Taylor, MD Feedback from TappMD Expert
Janet Taylor, MD
Autism
You always want to monitor screen time with children and teens and focus on face to face interactions. Computer and video games that improve language and communication skills may help kids and teens with autism interact socially and peer to peer.

Apr. 17, 2013 — Children and teens with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) use screen-based media, such as television and video games, more often than their typically developing peers and are more likely to develop problematic video game habits, a University of Missouri researcher found.

“Many parents and clinicians have noticed that children with ASD are fascinated with technology, and the results of our recent studies certainly support this idea,” said Micah Mazurek, an assistant professor of health psychology and a clinical child psychologist at MU. “We found that children with ASD spent much more time playing video games than typically developing children, and they are much more likely to develop problematic or addictive patterns of video game play.”

Mazurek studied screen-based media use among 202 children and adolescents with ASD and 179 typically developing siblings. Compared to typically developing children, those with ASD spent more time playing video games and less time on social media, such as Facebook. Children with ASD also spent more time watching TV and playing video games than participating in pro-social or physical activities. Conversely, typically developing children spent more time on non-screen activities than on TV or video games.

In another study of 169 boys with ASD, problematic video game use was associated with oppositional behaviors, such as refusing to follow directions or engaging in arguments. Mazurek says carefully controlled research is needed to examine these issues in the future.

Tapp here to read the rest of this article. 

 

Have you found any decent games for your children?

 

Story Source:

The above story is reprinted from materials provided by University of Missouri-Columbia.

Note: Materials may be edited for content and length. For further information, please contact the source cited above.

TAPP to read more.

Please contact content@tappnetwork.com with any DMCA or other intellectual property concerns.

Janet Taylor, MD

Dr. Janet Taylor is a Community Psychiatrist in New York City, the Bronx and Queens. The practice of Community Mental Health is extremely rewarding to Dr. Taylor, because "being on the frontline with individuals and their families battling the emotional and economic impact of Mental Illness is where I can make a difference". She attended the University of Louisville in Louisville, Kentucky for Undergraduate and Medical School. An internship in Internal Medicine at the Miriam Hospital-Brown University followed. Her psychiatric residency was completed at New York Medical College -Westchester Medical Center. She received a Master’s of Public Health in Health Promotion/Disease Prevention from Columbia University. She was a recipient of the 2008 Woman in Medicine Award (National Medical Association- Council of Women’s Concerns).