March 2, 2016

Janet Taylor, MD Feedback from TappMD Expert
Janet Taylor, MD
Vitamin D study in African-Americans
The study was done in African-Americans. Early findings indicate that higher doses of Vitamin D helps the body get rid of salt. Please check with your doctor before taking Vitamin D. It's not a substitute for anti-hypertensive medication, but may help.

We’ve heard many claims in the past decade — and much debate — about the role of vitamin D in the prevention and treatment of conditions as varied as brittle bones, heart disease, cancer, diabetes and dementia.

Now researchers at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston have what they think may be another tantalizing lead: Their study suggests moderate doses of vitamin D supplements might help reduce high blood pressure.

It was a small study in a particular group — roughly 250 African-American adults. “African-Americans have a much higher likelihood of being vitamin D deficient compared to other races, and also a higher likelihood of having high blood pressure,” says nephrologist John Forman, who led the study.

The risks of high blood pressure are long-established. Among other complications, hypertension in some people is thought to double the risk of having a heart attack or stroke. Earlier studies in animals and people have hinted that vitamin D supplements might mitigate that cardiovascular risk for some.

Forman and his colleagues randomly divided their study’s participants into four groups. One group took 1,000 international units of vitamin D a day, another group took 2,000 IU and another 4,000. The fourth group got a placebo; no one at the time knew which dose they’d been given. After three months of daily treatment, Forman checked everyone for changes in blood pressure.

 

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Janet Taylor, MD

Dr. Janet Taylor is a Community Psychiatrist in New York City, the Bronx and Queens. The practice of Community Mental Health is extremely rewarding to Dr. Taylor, because "being on the frontline with individuals and their families battling the emotional and economic impact of Mental Illness is where I can make a difference". She attended the University of Louisville in Louisville, Kentucky for Undergraduate and Medical School. An internship in Internal Medicine at the Miriam Hospital-Brown University followed. Her psychiatric residency was completed at New York Medical College -Westchester Medical Center. She received a Master’s of Public Health in Health Promotion/Disease Prevention from Columbia University. She was a recipient of the 2008 Woman in Medicine Award (National Medical Association- Council of Women’s Concerns).